The #1 Surprising Fact About Non Verbal Autism You Will Be Glad You Knew

michelle hatcher's powering parenting for autism

Have you come away from your child’s diagnosis assessment and wonder if they had got it wrong? Have you ever wanted to challenge being told your child won’t talk? Have you ever wanted to prove doctors wrong, because you know your child better than they do?

WELL YOU WERE RIGHT. NOW, HERE’S WHY…

In this video I share with you one surprising fact about non verbal autism that will encourage you to think again. It is THE #1 surprising fact about non verbal autism you will be glad you knew!

The current situation in the world means that more and more ASD children are not getting the support and teachers they need in schools as the demand for assistance reaches crisis point in many of our communities. This is bad for our children because they will never get the encouragement they deserve to achieve anything in life, thus meaning a future of loneliness, poverty and depression.

So these are our choices;

  • We take teaching into our OWN hands…
  • OR we say ‘blow it’ and leave our kids in the care of incompetent States. So, what’s it going to be for YOUR child?

This is what I need YOU to do to ensure your child does NOT get left behind as another failed statistic;

Watch the video, subscribe to our weekly news broadcast, download the FREE 3 STEP GUIDE TO EXPANDING YOUR CHILD’S SOCIAL ABILITIES and get set to change history, bring back your hard earned retirement cash and see your children’s independence become a thing of reality!

Don’t forget to pick up your FREE paper on how CBT can help your child expand their social and communcation skills with immediate effect…. https://michellehatchermedia.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/3-Step-Guide-To-Expanding-Your-Childs-Social-Abilities.pdf

 

Make Your Child’s Return To School Stress Free!

how to get your ASD successfully back to school after the holidays

how to get your ASD child back to school easilyThe end of the Christmas holidays, for many parents of ASD kids can be a blessed relief. The trauma of Christmas with its over stimulus of flashing fairy lights, noise and colour can be hugely confusing and terrifying for our children, that the welcome return of school can be a God send.

But how do you get your child back into the swing of school when their sleep patterns, daily activities and so on have been geared around being at home?

That’s easy!  For a parent like me with an Autistic teenager who also has a pathological aversion to getting up before noon, I have developed a quick and stress free strategy to coax even the most immovable children on the first day back at school! So here we go to ensure your ASD child gets back into the routine of school!

 

 

STEP ONE:

  • Rehearse!  One of the best ways I have enabled my son to get up ready for school on the first day back from any school break is to do a dummy run at least one day before. That way, the stress of waking up at what he decides is an ‘unearthly hour’ will be less anxiety filled for both of you. You might want to try it two days before. Simply remind them in the best way you know how the night before that this is what is going to happen so they can expect it. The key here is to the always try and take the sting out of the event. Gradual build up to something like going back to school will always be easier on everyone in the house!
  • Use small steps! Jon never, and still doesn’t like the idea of having to deal with any event in one hit. So when I need him to get up early and be ready to go somewhere like school, I will walk him through each step of the day, one bit at a time. If I know it is going to be a very intense event for him, I will go through the day half an hour at a time. That way, he knows he can feel calmer throughout the day so that he can focus on what is expected of him. If you’re not going to be physically with him, make sure that anyone who is going to be with him that day (school support, teaching assistant) has a heads up before of what they need to do.
  • Gently Gently! Jon is so much better to coax into doing something if I take the calm approach. There is no point losing my rag with him when I know that time is ticking on and he needs to get going. I have found that there is a much better way of asking him to do something if I word it like this…

‘Jon, if you have your breakfast now, you will be able to watch a few minutes of TV before the school bus arrives..‘ Rather than ‘Jon, you will be late if you don’t hurry up and eat your breakfast’

I find that the latter will only enable him to focus on the most stress making word in that sentence – late – so that won’t help with his stress levels and is more likely to hinder any motivation to want to move. Using word techniques to help people with Autism cope with tasks has been used for over 40 years in methods like NLP, but my particualr favourite is Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. It has helped people with all sorts of disorders from Autism to depression, not to mention how to help positive thoughts and keep your child motivated, happy and confident!

I have been using CBT with my son, Jonathan for almost ten years, but I will be honest with you. It has only helped Jon when I have tailored the methods and used the regularly. That’s the secret I have found to CBT. Using it in daily life, or at least a few times a week in activities is the only way to ensure that Jon gets the tools to help himself deal with the anxities of life that comes with Autism.

WHAT YOU CAN DO NEXT….

I would like you to download my FREE paper on how I have used CBT successfully in Jon’s life. I was determined to really get the best out of using techniques like the ABC Model and working with Schemas that I decided to become a qualified CBT Therapist myself.

So here I am, giving you a flying start in helping your child to be confident, independent and successful in social and communcaition skills! I think you will gain an awful lot from the technqiues I cover in this 23 page guide which I have written especially for you. It is completely FREE and the knowledge that I wish someone had told me about when Jon was first diagnosed!

 

 

How To Manage Bed Wetting In 7 Minutes

5 minutes on how to manage bewetting in autism

Hello there! Today, I am going to share with you my tips on how to manage childhood bed wetting in Autism in FIVE MINUTES.

First off, let’s talk about what are the causes of toddler and school bed wetting.

Did you know that bedwetting is a very common thing in childhood? In fact, 20% of all children under the age of 5 bed wet at some point. Children tend to grow out of it and only 1% are still bed wetting by the age of 15.

But what about Autism?

We know that stress levels are high in Autism. The average autistic child feels the same amount of anxiety first thing in the morning as a neuro-typical child feels in the middle of a school day. Many autistic children experience high levels of anxiety in everyday life. Meaning bedwetting can be a very frustrating problem for parents.

So, next, let’s tackle some common myths;

  1. Bed wetting is attention seeking behaviour; Rubbish. Bed wetting is uncontrollable for the child. They wouldn’t do it, if they could control it.
  2. It doesn’t run in families; Yes, it does. It can be hereditary.
  3. Kids bed wet because they are lazy: wrong again. It is uncontrolled and happens. The last reason it happens is laziness.
  4. Kids can control it consciously. Well, it’s hard to believe that some people still think that way…

Next, let’s look at TWO important things you must NEVER do:

NEVER make your child clean it up – this will only make them feel worse. Bed wetting is not bad behaviour and so therefore, cannot be managed this way.

NEVER tease or scold a child for wetting the bed. It’s no one’s fault that it happens.

Okay, so what CAN we do about it? Well, there are lots of ways we can tackle bed wetting. First off, reassure your child that they are safe, not naughty for doing it and that they are comforted and loved. Do this, and you are half way there to solving the problem.

Avoid late night drinks especially ones that contain caffeine. And late night snacks too. Also, it might be worth avoiding your child going to the toilet twice before bed. Once before preparation for bed and again just before they get into bed. It might sound like a good idea to ensure that their bladder is truly empty but this will only encourage their bladder to relax so that it could wee accidentally after the child has fallen asleep.

Check to see if it’s a medical problem. Contact your GP or doctor if your child has been dry for six months prior to bed wetting, particularly if they are over the age of 7, as it may be an infection like a UTI (urinary tract infection.) Ask your child if they feel a burning sensation when they wee. This sometimes it’s good indicator of an infection. Also, note if they are wetting themselves during the day. If they are school age, check with their teacher to make sure there isn’t anything stressful going on in school that you might not know about.

Once you see your GP, he will ask you about home life, family background and so to eliminate any stress that could be causing the bed wetting. Don’t forget, that children can easily pick up stresses felt by another member of the household.

Medication:

Your GP may offer medication to help your child sleep like Melatonin (you can find out more about Melatonin from our video here.) Or you might like to try some herbal remedies but check with your doctor first before giving these to your child.

Consider a mattress protector and even a moisture alarm which you can buy from Amazon. These are alarms, like baby monitors, which will alert you to any wetness in your child’s bed. This will encourage your child to get up and go to the bathroom, as you can wake them in time. You might also like to try waking your child up in the middle of the night to see if they want to go to the toilet.

Night plug in night lights to show a way to the bathroom if your house is very dark at night. Children fear the dark sometimes and this could be what’s stopping them from getting up and going to the loo.

If you want to find out more about bedwetting, you will love our video.

How to managed bed wetting in 7 minutes

Please subscribe if you want to know more about parenting Autism, tips, how to’s and stories.

You might also like to check out this website as I thoroughly recommend it!

www.myaspergerschild.com

 

 

 

Unleash The Positive Mind e-course is awarded top ratings on Udemy

top udemy courses

But there is more in store for this amazing parent and author. Read on to find out more.

The new and exciting Unleash The Positive Mind 2 hours e-course on Udemy focusing on CBT methods with Autism has, this week, been awarded 4.5 stars out of 5. Created by CBT and NLP therapist, Michelle Hatcher, she has worked hard on her research on communication skills over the last 10 years so she’s had little time to stop and reflect. With a #1 Best Seller on Amazon already making heads turn and the launch of the official course handbook, we caught up with her on her recent successes to ask why, where and what was the inspiration behind this revoluntionary course.

 

Following the mad rush to enrol by hundreds of students in its first 72 hour launch, the Unleash The Positive Mind course was expected by its creator, Michelle Hatcher, to do well, but says the mother and CBT Therapist, she was still taken by surprise. Yet her goal isn’t to stop there. Next week, she and Jon embark on some pretty life changing events…

It was quite extraordinary. I knew there was a call for parent training in Autism but we didn’t expect such popularity. It means that a lot of hard work and effort has paid off. I am delighted. My next venture is to document Jon’s forthcoming corrective spinal surgery due to his Scoliosis through a YouTube series. The idea is to do two things; one, to enable other parents out there with ASD children going through corrective surgery, and two, to help me through a pretty dark and emotional time. I never forget that I’m a parent too! It will be good therapy for me as well as helping others all over the world.

The short course which focuses on only a handful of carefully restructured CBT methods, has been an incredible help to many families already, encouraging once non-verbal children to quickly pick up communication skills which had been otherwise, put aside.  Michelle says,

I have always had the belief that some barriers in Autism are down to a deep lack of self-trust. Once children found an ability to do something well, the progression from there on is natural. Many parents experience their child’s frustration in not being able to be heard. It can be hugely disappointing for the parents when children move into their own closed worlds, feeling safe there.

The fact that families could see results by implementing some core strategies in communication is hugely encouraging, but it still has to be said that there is still no cure for Autism. Michelle Hatcher, mother of 15 year old Autistic Jon, whom she bases much of her work and research, said,

We must be realistic in our mind set that there may never be a cure for Autism, however, the methods I worked on with my own son have indeed, worked. Taking these methods beyond our own parameters, I’ve been able to work personally with other parents and got the same positive results.

So why is it down to the parents then to teach the skills that specialist teachers and ASD units should be doing? I found Michelle Hatcher had a firm answer to this.

The key when working with Autism is not to work against it but work with it. One of the things I discovered was that a child with Autism has a very powerful bond with their primary caregiver. Thus meaning that they see this person as their lead teacher in life. So in that case, why not just train this caregiver to teach the child what they need to learn? For me, it was perfectly simple. All I had to do as a parent was to teach my son the skills that the school wasn’t teaching him, for one reason or another.

Yet perhaps the one thing that does stick out from the success of this new e-course for parents is that schools are letting our children down. Does this mean that this course will highlight the failings once more of our own educational system?

That may well be the case, but I do think that for parents, this isn’t new news. Parents for many years have felt frustrations of their own when it comes to the relationship between school and home. This course is merely handing back to the parent the dignity and importance where some schools have undermined that in the past.

You can find out more about the e-course Unleash The Positive Mind here and download the official course handbook here. 

Follow Michelle on YouTube here and subscribe to her Autism Parenting series and follow her and Jon LIVE from Monday 28th of November ‘Correcting the Scoliosis’